SPIDR Documents

SPIDR Competencies for Mediators
Questions about what qualifies an individual to serve as a mediator in environmental and complex public disputes are arising with ever increasing frequency from potential clients and practitioners. As federal and state legislatures and government agencies seek to authorize and/or use mediation processes, they look for advice and guidance about who is qualified to mediate complex, multi-party cases. Likewise, parties to a conflict, who frequently have a voice in selecting a mediator, also look for assistance. And from the other side as aspiring mediators and mediators from other sectors explore working with complex public disputes, they too inquire about the basic credentials needed to function effectively in this arena.
SPIDR Report on Competencies in CM Design 
The Organizational Conflict Management Section of the Society of Professionals in Dispute Resolution (SPIDR) exists to help members excel at developing integrated organizational conflict management systems, so that organizations improve their ability to deal with conflict.
SPIDR Best Practices for Government Agencies
This recommendations in this report were developed through a joint effort of the SPIDR Environmental/Public Disputes Sector and the Consortium on Negotiation and Conflict Resolution in Atlanta, Georgia, supported by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. This report focuses on best practices for government agencies and other users in the United States and Canada, reflecting the membership of the SPIDR Environmental/Public Disputes Sector. While potentially applicable to other countries, the recommendations will likely need to be tailored to the political frameworks, institutions and cultural norms in those societies.
SPIDR Commission on Qualifications
The role of the SPIDR Commission on Qualifications is to examine the question of qualifications of mediators and arbitrators. Established by the Board of the Society of Professionals in Dispute Resolution, the Commission is composed of individuals representing a broad variety of backgrounds and experience. While the recommendations may have general applicability, the primary focus of the Commissions's inquiry has been on those areas of alternative dispute resolution in which legislatures and other public bodies are now seeking to establish criteria that define who can serve as a mediator or arbitrator. The Commission's recommendations have been approved by the SPIDR Board.