New Voices - 2016

 

Read the profiles and listen to "Ted Talk Like" presentations of the ACR New Voices Class of 2016.


In 2014 ACR introduced the New Voices:Emerging Professionals Program.  As part of the program, a juried selected process was developed with the goal of identifying seven new “voices” to present an area of research, a unique project or an area of practice in which the individual is engaged.  Meet ACR ‘s Class of 2016 New Voices: Emerging Professionals. 

Chelsea Cordnergraduated from Champlain College with Master's Degree in Mediation & Applied Conflict Studies in 2014. She works primarily as an inpatient psychiatry nurse with a focus on assisting clients through difficult life situations using conflict engagement, coping, and communication skills. She continues to remain engaged in conflict resolution within the healthcare setting, acting as a consultant, developing and facilitating workshops to decrease conflict between healthcare professionals while improving employee engagement and patient outcomes. She has most recently engaged with law enforcement with the goal of creating a more comprehensive approach to helping clients with mental illness in the community while maintaining client and officer safety. Chelsea enjoys hiking, swimming, kayaking, and spending time with her Jack Russell Terriers when she is not working.  Please note:  Chelsea Cordner and Ryan Nichols presented a joint presentation. 

Bill Froehlich is the Langdon Fellow in Dispute Resolution at The Ohio State University, Moritz College of Law where he teaches mediation, negotiation and alternative dispute resolution and manages the law school’s mediation clinic.  Bill also serves as the Associate Director of the Divided Community Project, a project designed to strengthen community efforts to transform community division into action.  A former labor attorney, Bill served as an advocate in mediation, arbitration and other dispute resolution forums.  Bill earned his J.D. from The Ohio State University, Moritz College of Law and is a graduate of Denison University.  Bill lives in Columbus, Ohio, with his wife Jessie and their deaf cat Pearl. 

Liz London is in her second year of the master's program at the School for Conflict Analysis and Resolution (SCAR) at George Mason University. She currently works as the Program Associate at One Common Unity, coordinating an after school peace education program for youth in D.C. public high schools. Liz is from New York City and graduated from Vassar College with a degree in English, focusing in Creative Writing. Before this, she worked for four years in Chicago at Literature for All of Us, facilitating book groups and poetry workshops with youth. She has also worked as a dialogue facilitator with Face to Face/Faith to Faith. Her focus is in conflict resolution programming with youth, restorative justice, and community-based practice.  

Sandra (Sandi) Moore began working in Alternative Dispute Resolution with court based mediation in Albuquerque, NM in 2013.  As the Community Support Coordinator for the U.S. Air Force at Lajes Field in the Azores, she worked to develop an online website to focus on online conflict prevention in family relationships.  She is currently working in Organization Development to build stronger, cohesive teams in U.S. Army Medicine. She has a Master’s in Public Administration in Health Science from Golden Gate University, and recently completed a Master’s of Science in Negotiation and Dispute Resolution from Creighton University. 

Ryan Nichols is a fourth year medical student at the University of Vermont College of Medicine and current co-chair of the ACR Healthcare Section. Prior to entering medical school, he completed a Master's Degree in Conflict Resolution from Georgetown University with a focus on the intersection of health and conflict. His interests include the role conflict resolution skills can play in the healthcare arena stateside, as well as the impact healthcare professionals can have in conflict settings abroad. Outside of conflict resolution and medicine, he enjoys riding his bike and running in the Vermont countryside.  Please Note: Ryan Nichols and Chelsea Cordner did a combined presentation. 

Vishal Shamsi is a mediator and trainer at National Centre for Dispute Resolution (NCDR) in Karachi, Pakistan since 2013. Over the course of past few years she has trained over 150 individuals in the art of mediation including Senior Civil Judges, Police Officers, Community Elders, Social and Political Workers, Religious Clerks, Chartered Accountants and Lawyers from all over Pakistan. During her Bar she received ‘Outstanding’ by securing 93% in the course of Alternative Dispute Resolution. Her Civil and Commercial Mediator certification is from ADRgroup and earlier this year she completed her LLM on Online Dispute Resolution from City University London.  Vishal enjoys writing and is the author of a mystery novel ‘Fake, Flight and Found’ currently in editing. She also enjoys politics, running marathons and volunteer work. In her free time she likes to bake and her retirement plans include opening her own café and art gallery.

Emily K. Skinner holds a B.A. in modern languages with a focus in Spanish and Portuguese from Rutgers University, a M.S. in Conflict Resolution and Analysis from Nova Southeastern University, and is currently perusing a Ph.D. in Conflict Resolution and Analysis. Her dissertation explores the social understanding of conflict and how it affects applied services.  She is the founder and President of, The Social Scientista, a social media platform that commits itself to transforming and engaging deeper and higher thinking of the world by analyzing past, present, and future social issues using a deconstructed social science perspective. She integrates unconventional and modern techniques and design to make the social sciences relevant and to employ theoretical concepts that are grounded in reality.  She has worked abroad developing social programs for women and children in South America and is committed to developing and transforming the social sciences and conflict resolution.  She currently teaches sociology at Hudson County Community College.

My name is Trina Zeimbekis and I am a graduate student of History at Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada.  My research focuses on a public health dispute between the Inuit of Nunavik and the Government of Canada.  You might ask yourself what brought me to ‘New Voices.’  In a nutshell, history to me is the story of conflict and violence over time.   What I like about the field of Conflict Resolution is that I get to be on the other side of that story where I may not be able to make conflict disappear, but I can at least learn more about how we can disagree constructively. I am a passionate believer in Conflict Resolution. What makes me tick is working together with others to wrap our heads around old problems in new ways.